HOME  Astero Basq Govt  B-Board Calendar Dance  Education Euskara FAQ  Meeting Members Mus  Music Pilota Youth  

     

 

 

EUSKALTASUNAREN ERRONKA
"Basque Continuity Challenge"

Related links:  GUREA Project    Zortziak-Bat    Choosing Basqueness

The singular remarkable fact about the Basques is that they still exist."
~Mark Kurlansky

In a real sense, Basques are “Europe’s oldest family.”  They are the oldest indigenous inhabitants of this corner of western Europe; they were there when the Indo-European ancestors of the Spanish and French arrived.  This people—always small in number and against the odds—found ways of keeping their traditions alive.  But modern times have presented a new set of challenges of retaining a sense of “Basqueness”—the sense of being Basque.

 

“I hear nothing,
I see nothing, I say nothing.”
 

The temptation is to not confront the challenges confronting our Basque club and hope for the best—that our traditions will continue to endure.  But unlike our ancestors, being Basque today is far more of a choice than it was before, and today we are bombarded by a wide assortment of alternatives that call for our “time, treasure and talent.”

The temptation is to not confront the challenges confronting our Basque club and hope for the best—that our traditions will continue to endure.  But unlike our ancestors, being Basque today is far more of a choice than it was before, and today we are bombarded by a wide assortment of alternatives that call for our “time, treasure and talent.” 

Proud of what exactly?  We have to find ways of answering this question in a positive sense if we hope that people will continue to identify as being Basque.

People today have a plethora of choices in today's society, so being Basque has plenty of competition.

This IS NOT primarily a money pitch (though sure money is needed to keep things going) nor is this about asking you to put a "Proud to be Basque" bumper-sticker on your car or wear a beret every day.  This IS ABOUT getting people to accentuate "Basqueness" as one of their multiple identities (e.g., as a parent, spouse, child, football fan, American, etc.). We're hoping to 1) raise the "awareness of Basqueness" across the generations and 2) find folks-young and older--willing and able to contribute their time and energy to keep our culture alive. 

http://www.nabasque.org/NABO/23206806.jpg

If a culture does not possess effective means of transmission from one generation to the next, then that culture is doomed to perish. Somehow, someway, against the odds, our ancestors found a way to preserve “Basqueness” across thousands of years.  Now it is our turn. We—those of us age 30 and above—cannot be the generation that breaks this long chain of continuity of one of the world’s oldest cultures. OLD & YOUNG WILL HAVE TO WORK TOGETHER TO MAINTAIN THE LINK!

To do this we have to work hard and work smart Please forward your ideas to info@nabasque.eus

 

"In the magazine for the Basque shepherds of North America, I read an article once, signed by a priest, in which he stated that the enormous change the world had undergone was not a gradual one, and that rural villages like Obaba had changed less in the twenty centuries from the birth of Jesus to the coming of television (c. 1950) than in the ensuing thirty years; and this, he wrote, was the reason why he, in his childhood, had played the same games as those depicted on the frescos in Pompeii (the Roman city that was entombed when a volcano erupted locking in time a moment thousands of years ago).
~From Bernardo Atxaga's
The Accordionist's Son

 

OSPATU + HEZITU = BETIKOTU:
Celebrate + Educate = Perpetuate